Tips For Travelling The Trans-Siberian Railway With The Family | The Viking Abroad
Travel Blogger from Norway
Travel Blogger from Norway
19195
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-19195,single-format-standard,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-7.8,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-4.11.2.1,vc_responsive
 

Tips For Travelling The Trans-Siberian Railway With The Family

21 Jul Tips For Travelling The Trans-Siberian Railway With The Family

Image by Kshchen via Flickr

 

I bet most people will agree with me that a Trans-Siberian Railway trip is one of the most popular train journeys. The railway connects Moscow with Vladivostok which is a town located in the far-east side of Russia. The Trans-Siberian railway is nearly 9,300 kilometres, meaning the journey takes more than one week. In this article, we shall discuss the tips for travelling the Trans-Siberian railway with your family. Here they are:
Booking Tickets

There are websites that have made booking very easy since you can now book your ticket and that of your family directly on these websites. However, when booking the tickets, there are things to consider. The first one is time – the Russian train schedules are listed in Moscow time. So unless you are in Moscow, you have to know whether the location you are is ahead or behind Moscow time. Another thing to consider is the departure/arrival station, putting in mind that Moscow has several stations. However, they are not located far from each other. Failing to know your departure station may lead to inconvenience and, at times, missing your train. To make your booking exercise smooth and quick, visit www.thetranssiberiantravelcompany.com.
Classes and Seating

The Trans-Siberian Railway provides three classes i.e. the Spalny wagon which is the first one, Kupe the second, and platzkartny the third. The first cabin is usually for two people and has better facilities, the second class is for four people and is best for someone travelling with family and friends while the last one is the third class which is basically an open wagon with dozens of beds.

 

In most cases, the first class is usually full of tourists and is considerably expensive while the second class has a closed cabin which provides privacy but does not provide much comfort. For more details, make sure to contact specialist consultants.
Food and Water

Opposite the attendant’s compartment, there is a samovar which has boiling water. However, it is recommended to bring your own water bottle which you can use when you need to refill water. The food available in the dining car and sold by vendors around the halls is usually overpriced and comes in a limited variety so it is advisable to bring your own food especially when you have a family and you are sure you will spend several days on the journey. For instance, you may bring dried fruits, granola bars, and pretzels which can help supplement meals offered in the train.
Facilities to Bring

Unless you are travelling on the first class, you can be sure you won’t have an electrical outlet of your own. The second class and third class has communal electrical outlets that are located in the corridors. For this reason, it would be great if you brought your personal electrical outlet extension with you. It will save you and your family a lot of headache. Another thing you may need is an electronic dictionary and a Cyrillic keyboard which will make it easier for Russian friends who you may find on board to type. Lastly, a pocket knife is also very helpful when it comes to opening food packages and at times cutting the food.
Stay Close to Train at the Terminals

Most of the time, the trains do not spend more than twenty minutes at the train stations. However, you may find some people being overwhelmed by the rural areas and they get tempted to wander around. Well, the train never waits for such people when the departure announcement is made. So, it is advisable to be keen because when you are left behind, you will be stuck in that place until the next train comes. Also, most train attendants speak very limited English and that is why it is important to understand key phrases and words that are used regularly on the train.

 

 

Take note of these tips and you’re sure to enjoy your Trans-Siberian trip with your family.

 

5 Comments
  • Sandy N Vyjay
    Posted at 02:16h, 25 July Reply

    I am fascinated by trains. The trans-Siberian railway must be one of the most epic rail road journeys in the world. Hope to get on this some day. Your tips are really very practical and sensible and would help in making the experience an enjoyable one.

  • Sarah Kim
    Posted at 11:58h, 25 July Reply

    Wow such a detailed post. I really like there is boiling water available, and your suggestion to bring my own water bottle! I love tea so this would be perfect. I’ll bring my own tea too 🙂

  • Colby
    Posted at 23:26h, 25 July Reply

    I love train travel and have always wanted to take a trip on the Trans Siberian Railway. It’s good to know that power outlets are not readily available. There’s nothing worse than being on a long trip with dead electronics.

  • Colby
    Posted at 23:26h, 25 July Reply

    I love train travel and have always wanted to take a trip on the Trans Siberian Railway. It’s good to know that power outlets are not readily available. There’s nothing worse than being on a long trip with dead electronics.

  • Agness of aTukTuk
    Posted at 12:03h, 06 August Reply

    This train journey is on my bucket list for a while, Vibeke. Excellent post! Do you suggest booking tickets in advance?

Post A Comment